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EP210, Ralph Blumenthal: Portals to UFOs

You Can Listen to This Episode on AnchorFM!

A New York Times reporter chases coincidences to uncover fantastic stories.

In this episode, Ralph Blumenthal describes his journey from New York Times crime reporter to writing about alien abduction. He believes in the power of books to “choose their authors,” rather than seeing the process as authors always being the ones to choose what books they will write.

Ralph gives a sample story of the coincidences revealed in his work: Noted Harvard psychiatrist and alien abduction researcher John E. Mack was run down and killed by a drunk driver in London on the night of Sept. 27, 2004, days before his 75th birthday. At nearly the same time, J. Wesley Boyd, a fellow psychiatrist and protege of Mack’s at Harvard, was landing in St. Petersburg, Russia, to attend a medical conference. In a taxi from the airport, Boyd looked out of the window to see a car ram into a crossing pedestrian. Boyd saw the man’s head slam onto the sidewalk and his legs crumple under the car. Later Boyd learned that his friend John Mack had been run over and killed in London at almost the same time, and in a very similar way. He was haunted by the painful synchronicity. 

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE. We would love to hear from you as well! If you have a coincidence story to share, please leave it in the comments below, and we will respond. 

Our guest Ralph Blumenthal is a Distinguished Lecturer at Baruch College of the City University of New York, and was an award-winning reporter for The New York Times from 1964 to 2009. Ralph has written and co-authored seven books on organized crime and cultural history. He co-authored the recent series of groundbreaking Times articles on the secret Pentagon program to investigate UFOs. He led the Times metro team that won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news coverage of the 1993 truck-bombing of the World Trade Center. In 2001, Blumenthal was named a Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to research the progressive career and penal reforms of Warden Lewis E. Lawes, “the man who made Sing Sing sing.” The book on Warden Lawes, “Miracle at Sing Sing,” was published by St. Martin’s in June, 2004. His most recent book is “The Believer: Alien Encounters, Hard Science, and the Passion of John Mack,” published March 15, 2021 by High Road Books of the University of New Mexico Press. Learn more at www.ralphblumenthal.com.

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

EP209, Sabrina Sauer: Improvise to Create Serendipity!

You Can Also Listen to this Episode on AnchorFM

By improvising with serendipity, Sabrina Sauer creates stimulating, rich environments and enthusiasm for flowing with the unexpected. 

Sabrina shares an example: “In my first year working as an assistant professor in Media Studies, I traveled to Milan for a conference. As I was relatively new to the field, I decided to watch a colleague’s presentation. Her session was chaired by a person who asked that colleague about a (in my mind) random topic that I also happened to be very interested in, just as I was thinking about that topic. I thought that that was a nice coincidence. Incidentally, I liked this person’s thought processes so much, that we are now married!”

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE

Our guest Sabrina Sauer is an Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, at the Research Centre for Media and Journalism Studies. She obtained an MA in Media Studies, a PhD in Science and Technology Studies, and professionally trained as an actor prior to writing her dissertation about user-technology improvisations as a source for Information and Communication Technology innovation, at the University of Twente (Netherlands). She has published about media production, the agency of users and technological artefacts, exploratory search, improvisation, and serendipity. Her current research focuses on the use of digital data in creative media production practices, social innovation, and digital humanities. Learn more at https://www.rug.nl/staff/s.c.sauer/. 

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

CCBB Episode 208, J.M. DeBord: Dreaming Life with Synchronicity

You can also LISTEN HERE to the episode via AnchorFM

“Row, row, row your boat gently down the stream, merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.” Here’s some evidence.  

In this episode, J.M. DeBord explores the relationship between dreams and synchronicity. For example, a young man starts dreaming about an anime show, and then discovers that it’s a real show. Further stories of incredible dream-real life coincidences follow.  

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE

Our guest J.M. DeBord is the author of four books, including the the best-selling Dream Interpretation Dictionary. He is the creator of RadOwl’s Dream School and a longtime moderator of the largest and most popular online community for dream sharing: dreams.reddit.com. He’s also a student of Carl Jung’s psychology and a moderator of that subreddit. Learn more at https://jmdebord.com or https://Dreamschool.net. 

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

CCBB Episode 207, Carol Bowman: Deceased Family Member Coincidences of Returning to the Family

You can also LISTEN HERE to this episode on AnchorFM

What if your 3 year old child tells you that they had been another relative of yours in a previous life. Is such a thing “just a coincidence”?  

Our guest on this episode, Carol Bowman, explores this topic based on her career researching phenomena relating to past lives. Carol is an author, a researcher of children’s past life memories, and a past life therapist for adults for over thirty years. We also discuss whether all coincidences are meaningful, and whether coincidences seem to increase at certain critical points in our lives.   

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now  offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are  available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE

As a past life researcher and therapist, Carol Bowman has published two books: Children’s Past Lives (Bantam Books, 1997) and Return From  Heaven (HarperCollins, 2001). These have been translated into more than 20 languages. She has appeared on many TV shows, including Oprah,  Unsolved Mysteries, Good Morning America, and ABC Primetime, as well as in documentaries on the BBC, A&E, CBC, and PBS.  She has also been a  guest on radio shows and podcasts.  She has lectured in the U.S., Europe, and South America. Learn more at https://CarolBowman.com.  

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today  blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his  psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

CCBB Episode 206, David Hench: A Poker Player Rolls the Synchronicity Dice

Poker players create coincidences. They play with random chance. Some can tilt the card shuffle in their direction while carefully playing by the rules. David Hench has survived the odds and now tells us about his coincidence-filled life of chance, statistics and poker cards. View on YouTube HERE, or listen on AnchorFM HERE.

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is available as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE [https://www.youtube.com/c/Coinciders/featured?sub_confirmation=1] to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast are also available, HERE: https://www.spreaker.com/show/dr-bernie-beitman-md. We would love to hear from you as well! If you have a coincidence story, please leave it in the comments below, and we will respond.

In this episode, we discuss with professional poker player and author David Hench his views on the significance of synchronicity and whether the universe is what it appears to be. David has always been intrigued by both sports statistics and palindromes, and became a trivia champion, forever keeping an eye on palindromes in letters or numbers. So imagine his surprise when, at age 50, he ordered his birth certificate and saw that he had been delivered into this world by a “Dr. Staats,” and that, beyond that uncanny coincidence, the certificate was littered with palindromes. Both the doctor’s first name (Bob) and last name (Staats) were palindromes, as was his time of birth: 6:06 PM. So David is a statictics (a.k.a.’stats’) fanatic, delivered into the world by Dr. Staats (both homonym for “stats’ and a palindrome). An auspicious debut into a life filled with synchronicities.

About our Guest

Our guest David Hench is a lifelong poker player, until recently. He is the author of a poker humor column called “Joker Journal,” and he later compiled the column into a book of poker humor. He’s currently a writer of spiritual, inspirational, human interest, sports and humor topics. In my writing now, he is an advocate for the true self of people. Learn more about David Hench at Sojourner-Publications.com.

About our Host

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. Dr. Beitman is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford, has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program, and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

CCBB Episode 205, Harley Rotbart: Using Coincidences to Live without Regret

A renown Pediatrician offers coincidence awareness as a key to No Regrets Living. Some astounding medical coincidences illustrate this idea.

In this episode, Harley Rothbart discusses phenomenal medical coincidences and relates them to the question of fate. He also addresses the problems with the Law of Very Large Numbers: the favorite explanation for coincidences by statisticians. This “law,” which cannot be proven, asserts that the strange events will inevitably occur in our busy world with its infinite opportunities for overlapping events.

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE.

Our guest Dr. Harley Rotbart has been a nationally renowned infectious diseases specialist, pediatrician, parenting expert, speaker, and educator for nearly four decades. He is Professor and Vice Chair Emeritus of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado. He is the author of more than 175 medical and scientific publications, and five previous books for general audiences: Miracles We Have Seen; 940 Saturdays; No Regrets Parenting; Germ Proof Your Kids; and, The On Deck Circle of Life, which was endorsed by baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr. Dr. Rotbart was named to Best Doctors in America for 18 consecutive years, as well as receiving numerous other national and local awards for research, teaching, and clinical work. He serves on the Advisory Boards of Parents Magazine and Parents.com and makes numerous media appearances every year, including two media tours with American Idol finalists to promote influenza prevention and two appearances on the Dr. Oz Show to discuss medical miracles. Dr. Rotbart writes his own blog at www.harleyrotbart.com. “Coach Harley” coached youth baseball and basketball for 16 years, including 8 years at the high school level. Dr. Rotbart and his wife, Sara, live in Denver, Colorado, and are the parents of three big kids and the grandparents of three little kids. Learn more at https://www.harleyrotbart.com.

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

CCBB Episode204, Janet Payne: Thin Veil to Synchronicity on Prince Edward Island, Canada

The veil between ordinary and extraordinary realities thins at certain times like Halloween and in certain places like Prince Edward Island, Canada. Here’s a synchronicity report from a woman with deep generational roots on the Island.

Watch on YouTube or LISTEN on AnchorFM

In this episode, Janet Payne describes how coincidences guide and impact her life. We also consider what might be the source of coincidences. Janet began to notice coincidences early in her life and seemed predisposed to becoming aware of them, for reasons that still puzzle her. Her dreams sometimes tell her of a difficulty arising for one of her 7 children or 4 grandchildren.

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE.

Our guest Janet Payne has worked as a site manager and counselor at Prince Edward Island, Canada Career Development Services for over 15 years and has also enjoyed working as a session instructor at University of PEI during most of this time. She is currently completing her PhD in Education and is focusing her dissertation on the importance of intuition and synchronicity within career counseling. She and her husband, Neil, have 7 children and 4 grandchildren and reside between Kinkora, Prince Edward Island, and Jamesville, Cape Breton.

CCBB Episode 203, Julie Mariel : Psychedelic Synchronicities of a Danish Anthropologist

Synchronicities lead Danish anthropologist and past-life therapist Julie Mariel Jespersen to Ayahuasca, which then leads her to further synchronicities and shamanistic experiences with interpersonal human energy fields.   

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also, 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast are available, HERE

In this episode, Julie Mariel Jespersen describes the coincidence-increasing effects of the mind-expanding South American potion, Ayahuasca (also known as Daime). Her synchronicity-inspired training experiences have now forged her into a modern day shaman who is able to clearly report  journeys into the 4th dimension, or what she calls “betwixt and between.” 

Our guest Julie Mariel Jespersen earned a master’s degree in anthropology at Aarhus University (Denmark). Her thesis, “The Reality of Illusion and the Illusion of Reality: An anthropological study of Ayahuasca ceremonies in a Dutch spiritual group,” was completed in 2016. She is a certified hypnotherapist, SoulKey-Therapist (2014) and -Instructor (2019). She has been trained in modern shamanism and healing by Danish modern shamans (2016-2020). She has worked independently as a therapist performing hypnotherapy, SoulKey therapy and healing and giving talks and courses on Ayahuasca, spirituality and personal development from an anthropological as well as a modern shamanic perspective. She runs the project ‘Portal Journeys’ with her colleague and sister, Rie Jespersen, bringing groups to spiritual places like the Bosnian Pyramids (about which Rie has written the book “De Bosniske Pyramider”). Julie is currently writing a book in Danish about Ayahuasca/Daime based on her fieldwork. She is featured in the spirituality section of Danish documentary “from the inside,” with journalist Anders Agger, set to  screen on Danish National Television, fall 2021. Learn more at https://juliemariel.com/.  

CCBB Episode202, Gordon Keirle Smith: Below the Ice-Antarctica Synchronicities

Reality and fiction overlap. Science fiction can become reality. Gordon Smith, author of Revelation Antarctica, will make you wonder. Today there are alternate facts depending upon who you ask — and alternate ways that human beings think about reality. Our guest on episode 202 is challenging beliefs dearly held by a majority of the world’s population, about the fundamental nature of reality. Science fiction may not be “just” fiction, but can be a way to think about new possibilities and new insights into the world around us.

View on YouTube or Listen Here

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast are available HERE.

In this episode, Gordon Keirle Smith shares more about what makes his new book, Revelation Antarctica, so different from most others works of fiction, or even different from much science fiction. We explore the notion of the book being “as real as you need it to be.” Gordon describes this work as a Quantum vision fired by imagination. Further, the reader is encouraged to read the 99 short sections of the book in any order that they might wish: reflecting the idea that time or chronology is an illusion.

Our guest Gordon Keirle Smith has led many lives in this lifetime. In England he was a Rosicrucian, advertising copywriter, assistant theater electrician and lighting board programmer. In France he worked in tourism, became an English teacher, invented a new artistic technique and then decided to “paint in words”. Upon partial retirement in 2014, Gordon published Genesis Antarctica, and wrote an introduction to reincarnation to Another Egg, Another Life: one edition for parents (2014) and one for children published in 2018. His Revelation Antarctica (2019) questions our concepts of reality by using multiple characters functioning at the interface of science fiction and convention. Published only a few months before COVID-19, it describes a plague that became our collective reality.

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder.

Research Suggests That Synchronicities Can Aid Psychotherapy

Therapist confidence about using synchronicity correlates with outcome.

Carl Jung described the paradigmatic synchronicity of the scarab-like beetle coming to his office window just as his patient was describing a dream of a scarab piece of jewelry during psychotherapy. Since then Jungians and others have recorded single cases. Recently investigators have carried out systematic research in the use of synchronicity during psychotherapy. Here’s hoping increasingly more researchers will study the ways in which synchronicity can become a useful psychotherapeutic technique as has Dr. Reefschläger in this report. (BDB)

Introduction

permission of Gunnar Immo Reefschläger

Gunnar Immo ReefschlägerSource: permission of Gunnar Immo Reefschläger

My name is Gunnar Immo Reefschläger, and I am a researcher from Frankfurt, Germany. I focus on modern concept research in the field of Analytical Psychology. Moreover, I am a clinical psychologist, a psychodynamic-oriented personal coach, and currently, a psychotherapeutically and psychoanalytical candidate at the Institute of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis in Andernach, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. Having finished and released my dissertation in German in 2018, Dr. Bernard Beitman kindly encouraged me to publish my findings for an English speaking readership.

In the following, I would like to give you a short and concise introduction to some of my general findings. After giving you an example of a typical participant’s report of synchronicity that happened in the context of psychotherapy, I will explain how I came across Carl Jung’s concept of synchronicity, and how I conducted my study. Feel free to contact me through the links below if you have any thoughts. 

A case of synchronicity in psychotherapy

First, I would like to give you a typical example of synchronicity that can happen in the context of psychotherapy. The following excerpt is from a case that can be found in my doctoral dissertation(1):

”A 16-year-old patient who is suffering from anxiety goes on a final school trip to Berlin. It is her first trip away from home; she feels fearful and excited at the same time. However, her feelings transform into being overwhelmed. She tries to contact me spontaneously by mobile phone. I almost never switch on my mobile phone, but exactly at this moment it is on and I can give comfort to my patient. As a consequence of this moment, our therapeutic relationship deepened as I saw her in our next session.”

We need more modern concept research: The way to my study

I became fascinated by stories like these when a friend gave me a copy of Hopcke’s book There Are No Accidents (2) where I read the term synchronicity for the first time. During my studies of psychology at school, I noticed to my surprise that there was very little research about the concept of synchronicity because it was labeled as “psychological non-sense“ by my behavioristic-focused psychology department. In general, Analytical Psychology and its Freudian cousin Psychoanalysis were discarded as non-scientific. However, I had the feeling that it was an important and crucial concept of psychotherapy that just needed to be investigated more since strange coincidences connect people in a way that can be useful for both patient and therapist and their relationship. Consequently, I looked for a psychology professor who would be interested in supporting my idea to give the concept of synchronicity an empirical foundation so it would be acknowledged as a valid therapeutic concept.article continues after advertisement

A first step to an empirical foundation of synchronicity: The study

For my study, I collected a number of cases where synchronistic moments happened in the context of psychotherapy. This first step took me a time period of nine months. My cases consisted of 1) personal interviews I had with therapists, 2) synchronistic moments that happened during therapy which were documented by articles, books, and literature, and 3) questionnaires that Jungian therapists could use as an alternative to personal interviews.

To get a high number of personal interviews, I reached out to all Jungian training institutes that were listed on the website of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (3) asking them if they would be willing to endorse my study and send a study invitation via e-mail to their members. Institutes in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland received a German version of my study invitation, all other institutes an English version. In addition to that, I sent out study invitation flyers to all Jungian institutes in Germany (Berlin, Stuttgart, Munich) via mail. Next, I also posted my study invitation online on several forums, groups on Facebook. For people who reacted to my invitation over Facebook, I asked them to give me some kind of proof that they had been working as a therapist. (e.g scan of their license to practice).

For therapists who responded to my study invitations, I sent an informed consent form that needed to be filled out by both therapist and patient allowing me to use the provided material. I conducted the actual interviews face-to-face, via telephone, or via Skype. For therapists who could or would not telephone, meet me personally, nor Skype, I offered to send my interview questions via email, so that they could answer them in a written form. In the end, I conducted 12 interviews personally and I received 12 email responses, in which therapists answered my interview questions in a written form.

Next, for conducting interviews, I searched for already documented synchronicities that happened during psychotherapy. I used different keywords and keyword combinations (e. g. “synchronicity”, “synchronicity and psychotherapy”, “synchronistic”) on Google and Google Scholar to find cases that were documented. Books, dissertations, and articles that seemed to be possibly relevant for my interest, I read in-depth (5; 6). The length of an actual narrative was not important, however, I dismissed narratives that were too short (e. g. when it only consisted of one sentence). In the end, I found 22 narratives of synchronicities that happened in the context of psychotherapy.

Results

After nine months of collecting data, I had a total number of 46 cases/reports of synchronicities that happened in psychotherapy. Next, I looked at how these cases were presented and/or written. I analyzed the cases using several questions including: “Did the synchronicity include a dream, premonition, or a concrete statement/behavior?“ Or “Did the synchronicity happen over a physical distance or in a physical closeness?“ In this way, I had a total of 22 questions I asked the therapists I interviewed, or I answered them myself regarding the already documented cases. Most of my questions came from publications of my doctoral advisor Christian Roesler (7). Afterward, I tried to find out if there are any tendencies of all cases in response to my questions.

Here are some results I found: There were more synchronicities reported/documented 1) that included pre-monition than dreams 2) that happened in a physical distance, e. g. over several kilometers, rather than a physical closeness, e.g. over some meters 3) that happened not simultaneously, e.g. a person dreaming synchronistically of events occurring the next day, than simultaneously, e.g. a person knowing synchronistically what another person does at the same time. I also tried to look at several possible relations between my questions through statistical methods. My results show, for example, that there is a relation between a concrete, self-assured reaction of the therapist regarding an occurred synchronistic moment and a positive consequence for the therapeutic relationship. Moreover, the more secure, aware, and specific a therapist reacts to a synchronistic moment in the context of psychotherapy, the more likely it has a positive impact on the therapeutic relationship and the therapy process itself.

What needs to happen: More therapists need to know the concept of synchronicity

In conclusion, one can say that paying attention to synchronistic moments in therapies can be a beneficial factor for therapy if the therapist is trained and self-assured in the topic of synchronicity. Consequently, it would be advisable if the topic of synchronicity is being taught more in therapy training institutes, so that future therapists can recognize synchronicities better and see them as a potential source for additional therapeutic interventions, that can support the patient by experiencing even more meaning in his or her life.

Reference

1)Excerpt of case 23 of Reefschläger, G. (2018). Synchronizität in der Psychotherapie; Eine quantitativ-qualitative Untersuchung der strukturellen Beschaffenheit synchronistischer Phänomene im psychotherapeutischen Prozess. [Dissertation]. Frankfurt/Oder: Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt.

2) Hopcke, R. H. (1998). There are no accidents: Synchronicity and the stories of our lives. Riverhead Books (Hardcover).

3)International Association for Analytical Psychology – IAAP. (2020, November 21). https://iaap.org

4) Hill, J. (2011). Synchronicity and grief: The phenomenology of meaningful coincidence as it arises during bereavement. [Dissertation]. Institute of Transpersonal Psychology.

5)Brandon, N. (2015). Synchronicity: A phenomenological study of Jungian analysts’ lived experience of meaningful coincidence in the context of psychotherapy. [Dissertation]. California Institute of Integral Studies.

6)Roesler, C. (Ed.). (2018). Research in analytical psychology: empirical research. Milton Park, Abingdon: Routledge