All posts by bernie

Evidence for Extra-Human Intelligence: Les Velez, EP 242

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.fm

Reality is often stranger than fiction. If you have ever seen or experienced something innately other-worldly, you are not alone. Our conversation today will go into discussions of how we are all connected, and how humanity is not alone in this endeavor of life.

Our guest, Les Velez is a graduate of the University of Vermont with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration, as well as US Army veteran, and former VP of Luscombe Engineering. In 1991, Les joined MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network, and has held the following positions: Field investigator, Training Coordinator for field investigators, the Assistant State Director in Northern California, Chairman of the A.E.R.C. (Abduction Experiencer Research Committee), and team leader of the A.R.T. (Abduction Response Team) (Experiencer Resource Team) and presently holds the position of research consultant for the Experience Resource Team. In 1994, Velez co-founded the Organization for Paranormal Understanding and Support. He is the author of The Unknown Other and the Existential Proposition of Alien Contact. Learn more at opusnetwork.org Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted!

Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE [https://www.spreaker.com/show/dr-bern…]

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

Psilocybin, Depression, Synchronicity, Connectedness: Rosalind Watts, EP 241

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.fm

Psychedelics increase meaningful coincidences as psilocybin researcher Ros Watts tells us. Depressed clients treated with psilocybin experience increases in synchronicities but are sometimes bewildered and frightened by them. Psilocybin therapists also experience increases but are reluctant to talk about them.

These psychonauts discover basic nature codes which include sine waves, the web of human and nature connectedness, and the slow pace of substantial change. Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel.

Our guest, as Clinical Lead of the Psilocybin for Depression Study at Imperial College London, and Clinical Director of Synthesis Institute, Dr. Rosalind Watts recognised the potential of psychedelic therapy, but also its risks and pitfalls, namely that the psychedelic substance can open the door, but real, long-lasting benefits depend on substantial integration support. She is now the founder and director of Twelve Trees Integration, a global community with online and in-person aspects to support people in the months and years after their psychedelic experiences.

Twelve Trees focuses on helping people build their connectedness to self, others and the natural world which is the mechanism that Dr Watts discovered to be underpinning the changes observed in her psilocybin for depression research, leading her to develop a psychometric tool for measuring connectedness (Watts Connectedness Scale (the WCS)’. Dr Watts co-founded the UK’s first psychedelic integration group, and is a consultant psychologist for Small Pharma, investigating DMT as a treatment for depression.

TEDx: Can magic mushrooms unlock depressions?

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com.

The 5 Most Common Coincidences

Two statistical approaches with overlapping outcomes

To describe and classify is often the first step in developing a new science. Like the early botanists, I am developing a taxonomy for coincidences. Early botanists noticed similarities and differences among plants and categorized them; I’ve noticed the similarities and differences between the coincidental flora and fauna in the forest of daily life.

University of Cambridge Data

David Spiegelhalter at the University of Cambridge collected 4,470 coincidences; Julie Beck reported the results of an analysis of these stories in The Atlantic. A solid 58% of the coincidences “included words related to family or loved ones, indicating that people are more likely to notice coincidences involving people closest to them.”

Data Map Created by Quid, Spiegelhalter Coincidence Story Analysis

The five most common types of coincidences in this analysis were:

  1. Sharing a birthday with someone (11%)
  2. Connections involving books, TV, radio, or the news (10%)
  3. Vacation-related coincidences (6.1%)
  4. Meeting people in transit—while walking around, in airports, or on public transportation (6%)
  5. Coincidences related to marriage or in-laws (5.3%)

Spiegelhalter is a statistician who believes that coincidences are best understood as interesting examples of the laws of probability at work. For example, the probability of two people having the same birthday is 1/365, which means that if you tell 365 people when your birthday is, you are very likely to find at least one person who shares the same birthday.

Vacation-related coincidences tend to involve unexpectedly running into someone you know. Since you probably know a great many people and you are part of a specific socio-economic group that is likely to take vacations in the same places, the probability of running into someone you know is also fairly high.

The image above is a map by Quid, a data analytic company, made from the full Spiegelhalter study data set. Each dot represents one story, and the lines connect stories that have very strong linguistic similarities. So, the light blue birthday cluster is tightly snarled, because there are only so many variations on finding out you share the same birthday as someone else. But the red cluster of shared death dates has some connections to the birthday cluster, indicating that some coincidence stories involve both birth dates and death dates.

The researchers also looked at the tone of the stories and found that more people described their coincidences using negative language (32%) or neutral language (41%) than positive language (25%). This finding is unexpected because synchronicities are generally considered to be positive experiences.

Weird Coincidence Survey (WCS)

My research approached the question in a different way. While Spiegelhalter asked participants to report their stories, I asked participants to rate the frequency of common coincidences. The list of common coincidences was gleaned from a much longer group of possibilities. (The 12 items of the WCS can be found on my website. You can take the survey to see how sensitive to coincidences you are.)

From 1551 respondents to the website of the WCS, the most common coincidences were:

  • I think of a question only to have it answered by an external source (i.e. radio, TV, or other people) before I can ask it.
  • I think of an idea and hear or see it on the radio, TV, or Internet.
  • I think of calling someone, only to have that person unexpectedly call me.
  • I advance in my work/career/education by being in the right place at the right time.

In descending order of frequency, the rest of the items lined up like this:

  • I need something, and the need is then met without my having to do anything.
  • I am introduced to people who unexpectedly further my work/career.
  • I run into a friend in an out-of-the-way place.
  • When my phone rings, I know who is calling without checking the screen or using personalized ring tones.
  • Meaningful coincidence helps determine my educational path.
  • I think about someone and then that person unexpectedly drops by my house or office, or passes me in the hall or street.
  • I experience strong emotions or physical sensations that were simultaneously experienced at a distance by someone I love.
  • After experiencing meaningful coincidence, I analyze the meaning of my experience.

The specific frequencies for each item are listed in this bar graph:

Source: Beitman, Weird Coincidence Survey (2016)

In both my analysis and the analysis of stories submitted to Spiegelhalter, coincidences involving external media are relatively common. Though there are some similarities, it is interesting that some different categories grew out of the two different approaches.

I developed my categories through an extensive literature review and statistical winnowing. Quid analyzed the content of voluntarily submitted stories to develop its categories.

The Quid analysis includes categories of marriage- and hospital-related coincidences, which I did not include in my survey. I include categories Quid does not, such as coincidences related to careers and the reflection of one’s thoughts in the external environment.

As we develop the science of Coincidence Studies, ongoing data analyses like these will sharpen the categorization of the coincidences.

Co-authored by Tara MacIsaac, a reporter and editor for the Beyond Science section of Epoch Times. She explores the new frontiers of science, delving into ideas that could help uncover the mysteries of our world.

Synchronicity, Eruptions of Meaning: Ray Grasse, EP 240

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.fm

Right at the start of our interview, Ray Grasse’s mind mirrored my mind. This coincidence illustrates our meaning-filled lives, how outer reflects inner, and as above so below. We live in and among patterns. Take a closer look!

Ray Grasse is an author of seven books, including The Waking Dream, An Infinity of Gods, Signs of the Times, and The Sky Stretched Out Before Me. He worked on the editorial staff of the Theosophical Society from 1989 to 1999, and has been associate editor of The Mountain Astrologer magazine for over 20 years. He has studied with teachers in both the Kriya Yoga and Zen traditions. His websites are www.raygrasse.com and www.raygrassephotography.com.

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

Fractals-The Foundation of Synchronicity: Terry Mark-Tarlow, EP 239

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.fm

The universe is composed of fractals. From the cells of the body to far away galaxies, fractals move the patterns for patterns. Branching, for example, exists in neurons, lungs, capillaries, tree roots and branches, and snowflakes. Fractals are composed of pattern repetitions across both time and space. They merge our inner world and our outer world, governing intuition. They form the foundations for synchronicities.

Our guest, Terry Marks-Tarlow, PhD, is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Santa Monica, California. She is adjunct professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute, Santa Barbara and California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco. She is author of numerous books on clinical intuition, creativity, interpersonal neurobiology, and nonlinear science. She attempts to walk her talk by illustrating all of her books, doing yoga and dancing jazz and ballet. She has co-founded and curated Mirrors of the Mind: The Psychotherapist as artist for the past 10 years as well as written the libretto for two operas that opened in New York City with ballets.
www.markstarlow.com

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

SynchroMirrors in Physical and Virtual Realities: Dhamindra Jeevan, EP 238

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.FM

Each of us is a piece of a fractured mirror, seeking to rebuild our universal mirror. Jee began early in life to connect patterns, seeing meaningful coincidences all around him. Using his strong visual capacities he is leading the way to tuning our powerful social media into aids to the re-integration of all living beings. He sees the potential of virtual realities to heal rather than fracture. We can choose to embrace his optimistic vision.

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE [https://www.youtube.com/c/Coinciders/…] to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE: https://www.spreaker.com/show/dr-bern.

Our guest Jeevan is a futurist, systemic constellations facilitator, and artist residing in Vancouver, BC. Born in Sri Lanka, raised in Calabar, Nigeria, and Montreal, Quebec, he is now living in Vancouver, British Columbia, where he is on an 11-year venture to consciously tune on technology to serve all living beings. He believes we can secure the future by creating Human11, the digital human twin He wants to create the Operating System “genie” that will empower humanity to harmonize divisiveness by connecting all the dots. Connecting our dots will help us to rise toward co-creation and co-elevation.

https://human101.club/https://www.hanuman11.com/https://human11.ai/

Podcasts: https://evolvingman.com/archetypes-ar…https://themavenshavencom.wpcomstagin…

IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm4084514/

Artwork: http://jeevan11.com/

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

Do Coincidences Signal That It’s ‘Meant to Be’?

Those pesky false promise coincidences.

For many people coincidences are “all good”: If you wait long enough, you can probably find a positive outcome. In this post we look at coincidences that from the beginning seem to promise a great outcome but then yield nothing.

A prominent journalist had applied for a job. On a flight, he discovered that he was seated next to the boss of the person with whom he’d been talking about the job. What a coincidence! They had a good talk, and he thought it meant that he would get the job.

He didn’t.

Romance probably breeds the most “false promise” coincidences, especially for individuals who over-rely on coincidences as metaphysical signposts pointing to the “path” they should take. The excitement of a new romantic interest can be greatly boosted by surprising coincidences that seem to signal a profound bond—presumed signs that a relationship is “meant to be.”

In his book, When the Impossible Happens, psychiatrist Stanislav Grof wrote of a romance fueled by coincidences that burned brightly but faded quickly: Two of his friends had suggested he meet Joan Halifax, a friend of theirs, and one with whom they felt he had much in common. After several months, Grof decided to give her a call. He was going to present a paper at an American Psychiatry Association (APA) meeting in Dallas and figured he could swing by Miami (where she lived) to visit her on his way back home to New York.

As it turns out, she was also going to the APA meeting—and they had both, coincidentally, booked rooms in the same hotel. Without having communicated about where they could meet, Grof coincidentally met her at the first conference event he attended. They had never seen each other, and no one introduced them at the event, but when they saw each other across the room, they somehow recognized each other.

A series of other coincidences pulled the relationship speedily toward marriage. Even at the wedding, a repeated theme of rainbows seemed to bestow blessings and good auspices for the union.

But the morning after the wedding, Grof had a coincidence hangover: “As soon as I opened my eyes,” he wrote, “I sensed that something was terribly wrong. All the thrill and ecstatic feelings of the preceding day were gone; I felt sober and somber. The wave of excitement we had experienced the last few days suddenly felt illusory and deceptive. And what was worse, marrying Joan suddenly seemed like a serious error.”

It wasn’t long before they divorced.

He concluded, “I learned not to trust unconditionally the seductive power of such experiences….It is essential to refrain from acting out while we are under their spell and not to make any important decisions until we have again both feet on the ground.”

Lynn Corrigan posted her own false-promise coincidence series on Facebook:

“I know someone with whom I share so many coincidences all the way back to childhood. The way we met as adults was also full of coincidences and long shots. Yet I need this person out of my life now. I wish we never met. So I’m wondering why the heck he was put in my path.”

A man named Sahmat told me that read a book by a woman with whom he realized he had a lot in common: “I was most struck by the appearance of three synchronicities in our backgrounds,” he said. “We both grew up in Quaker families outside of Philadelphia, both were trained as biologists, and both eventually went to seminary and got an advanced degree in religious studies. I thought, ‘This is pretty unusual; we may be the only two Quaker biologist seminarians on the planet.’” On the way to meet her, he saw many references to the number 37, one of his numbers. These numerical sightings confirmed for him that he was on the right path.

And then he met up with this woman and found that they were not at all suited to each other.

The experience made him reflect on recent failures in attempts to make new connections with people. He realized he should instead revive older connections, specifically with his friend Larry.

The timing of the reconnection was perfect: It turned out that Larry had been working on a project that required Sahmat’s help. “So on the surface, my experience with the woman…turned out to be a ‘false promise synchronicity,’ but because I sought deeper guidance, it turned out not to be a false promise at all, but rather a necessary step to the real next connection I needed to make.”

Quoting Bob Dylan, he said, “There’s no success like failure.”

The paradox presented by coincidences is described by cognitive scientists Thomas Griffiths of Brown University and Joshua Tenenbaum of MIT in their 2007 paper “From Mere Coincidences to Meaningful Discoveries,” published in the journal Cognition:

“[Coincidences] seem to be involved in both our most grievous errors of reasoning, and our greatest causal discoveries.”

Griffiths and Tenenbaum were primarily looking at the role of coincidence in scientific discovery. But some of their discussion may also be applied to the discovery of romantic love or personal opportunity through coincidence: “Coincidences,” they wrote, “are events that provide support for a hypothesis, but not enough support to convince us to accept that hypothesis.” Let’s say the hypothesis is that a relationship, or even a marriage, will work out very well. The point is that a person should not wholeheartedly believe that hypothesis based on the coincidences alone.

The other extreme would be to ignore all coincidences out of fear that they are misleading. But as these researchers point out, some of the greatest scientific discoveries have been made through coincidence (and likely some of the greatest romantic discoveries, too).

The chances were good that Sahmat would connect well with a fellow Quaker biologist seminarian because they shared key interests. Just because it didn’t work out doesn’t mean he should ignore all such coincidences in the future. And he used his false promise coincidence as a stepping-stone to a more secure relationship.

There’s a whole field of study dedicated to hope—including false hope. Some researchers in this field worry that people who have false hopes, often based on illusions, will suffer psychological blows when they fail. Yet other researchers, such as Charles R. Snyder at the University of Kansas, think that a high-hope approach to life, even if it includes some minor illusions, leads to greater success and even psychological resiliency.

Running into each other unexpectedly in an out-of-the-way place, having family members with the same names, seeing rainbows at your wedding—all such coincidences may contribute to that feeling of magic when two people fall in love. But can they live with each other on a daily basis and share life together in a meaningful way? That’s a consideration beyond coincidence.

Co-authored by Tara MacIsaac, a reporter and editor for the Beyond Science section of Epoch Times.

Mystical Body Postures: Laura Lee, EP 237

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.fm

Simply hold your body in a postures used by our ancient people, and doors to mystical experiences open to feel your part in the oneness and timelessness of our reality. 

Our guest Laura Lee, along with her husband Paul Robear, are the Directors of the Cuyamungue Institute, a non-profit, anthropological research institute. They teach, research, write, and present on the wisdom tradition of our indigenous ancestors, accessed through decoding ancient artifacts of Paleolithic Europe and beyond. Laura hosted the Laura Lee Show on nationally syndicated terrestrial radio for a dozen years, and with Paul, co-hosts a wide range of interviews from the arts and sciences as part of their research mission, with Conversation4Exploration

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

Beyond UFOs: Rey Hernandez, EP 236

Or listen to an audio version HERE on Anchor.FM


Imagine seeing a family member and your beloved sick dog disappear in front of your eyes. Then they return. Their dog is healed! What would that do to your view of reality?

We would love to hear from you as well! If you have a coincidence story to share, please leave it in the comments below, and we will respond. 

Connecting with Coincidence with Bernard Beitman, MD (CCBB) is now offered as both an audio podcast–anywhere that podcasts are available–and in video format on the Connecting with Coincidence YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to our channel to be notified when future episodes are posted! Also available, there are 138 archived episodes of the CCBB podcast available, HERE [https://www.spreaker.com/show/dr-bern…]

Our guest, Reinerio (Rey) Hernandez, a former atheist and rationalist, in 2012 Rey Hernandez had a series of experiences that changed his life forever. He and his family experienced firsthand contact with non-human intelligence and UFOs, including one 45-minute encounter with a football field-sized craft. Additional paranormal experiences prompted Rey’s shift into a profoundly spiritual life.

Rey is a state tax attorney for the department of treasury, and a Ph.D. Candidate in Urban planning University of California at Berkeley. He is also Directing at the Consciousness & Contact Research Institute, CCRI

Email:  Info@Experiencer.Org

Website:   AGreaterReality.Org  (up in February, 2022)

Our host Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project. His book, and his Psychology Today blog, are both titled Connecting with Coincidence. He has developed the first valid and reliable scale to measure coincidence sensitivity, and has written and edited coincidence articles for Psychiatric Annals. He is a visiting professor at the University of Virginia and former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. Learn more at https://coincider.com

“There Are No Coincidences”

This statement is a paradox.

When uttering the phrase, “there are no coincidences,” the speaker feels fully confident in its truth. But, just like coincidences themselves, the meaning depends on the beliefs of the person involved.

Let’s start by looking closely at the word coincidence. Dictionaries usually define it as two or more events coming together in a surprising, unexpected way without an obvious causal explanation. Embedded in the definition is a hint that there might be an explanation.

This possibility of an explanation creates the opportunity for saying “there are no coincidences.” If a cause can be defined, then there is no coincidence.

Many believe that Fate or Mystery, or the Universe or God, causes coincidences. Their faith in something Greater provides them with a cause. Since God causes them, the cause is known. Therefore, there are no coincidences.

Statistically-oriented people believe that coincidences can be explained by the Law of Truly Large Numbers, which states that in large populations, any weird event is likely to happen. This is a long way of saying that coincidences are mostly random. Because statisticians “know” that randomness explains them, coincidences are nothing but strange yet expect-able events that we remember because they are surprising to us. They are not coincidences, just random events.

Those who believe in Mystery are more likely to believe that coincidences contain messages for them personally. They may think, “It was meant to be,” or “Coincidences are God’s way of remaining anonymous.” Some of those in the random camp can find some coincidences personally compelling and useful.

“Randomness” and “God” Explanations Remove Personal Responsibility

Each of these two explanations take responsibility for coincidences away from you! Each suggests that you are powerless in the face of inexplicable forces.

Randomness says you have nothing to do with creating coincidences—stuff just happens because we live in a random universe. You think coincidences may have something to do with you, but they don’t. When God is called in to explain coincidences, you are the recipient of divine grace. If you think you had something to do with it, you are deluding yourself.

Randomness and God are extreme positions in a coincidence dance that usually involves you, to varying degrees. Probability plays a necessary role. Some coincidences are more unlikely than others. Mystery plays a role because our minds cannot grasp the multiple stirrings hidden behind the veil of our ignorance. Here lies some of the beauty in the study of coincidences. They make us wonder. How much do we have to do with them, and how much is beyond our current concept of ourselves in the world?

It’s Your Choice

Coincidences exist. Coincidences are real. Saying that there are no coincidences stops inquiry. Challenging the statement forces us to make sense of its ambiguity and explore our potential involvement. You can choose the random perspective and with a wave of a mental hand, dismiss most coincidences as not worth further attention. Or, you can seek out their possible personal implications and make life into an adventure of discovery both about yourself and the world around you. As you explore, you may uncover the latent abilities hidden within you.